BC Council for Families

February 2012

  • Mothers’ Depression Changes Babies Language Learning

    Feb 24

    by Pilar Onatra
    Program Coordinator

    According to new research released from UBC, babies born to depressed mothers acquire language skills at a slightly different rate than do babies of non-depressed women. Not only that, but the children of women treating their depression with serotonin reuptake inhibitors, or SRIs (a common antidepressant) also show unique differences in language acquisition. What does this mean for parents, and for kids?

  • Too Hot for Tots: New Burn Prevention Resources Available

    Feb 27

    by Marilee Peters
    Acting Executive Director

    Frances MacDougall is a woman with a mission. After years of working as a clinical nurse on the Burn Unit at BC Children’s Hospital, and seeing firsthand the serious trauma inflicted on young children by common household hazards, she knew that a public education program to teach parents about burn risks was needed. So she developed it.

  • Protecting All Children's Right to Play

    Feb 20

    by David Sheftel
    Program Coordinator

    Here's something we hear a lot these days: kids need to play outdoors more.  But what about children who don't live in safe neighborhoods?  What about children from economically disadvantaged families,  whose parents must spend long hours working just to ensure the day-to-day survival of the family, and who may be to exhausted, or too stressed, to play with them or to supervise their playtime?

  • Viral Parenting: When Family Fallouts go Public

    Feb 20

    by Marilee Peters
    Acting Executive Director

    The Internet has a new star: “Nine-shot Tommy Jordan.” On February 8, Jordan, an upset father in North Carolina, uploaded a video to YouTube of himself responding to an angry posting he had just discovered on his 15 year old daughter's Facebook wall. In that Facebook posting, which he read aloud in the video, his daughter detailed her frustration with what she considered the "unfair" aspects of her life -- the daily chores she was expected to complete, her parents' expectations, her lack of freedom. Her father disagreed with her analysis of her poor quality of life, and with her decision to share her unhappiness publicly using a laptop and software that he had paid for.

  • Nanaimo Young Parents Building Resilience

    Feb 13

    by Pilar Onatra
    Program Coordinator

    What contributes to resilience for teen mothers and their children? To answer that question, researchers from Vancouver Island University have been talking with some of Nanaimo's young mothers.  It's well known that young mothers frequently face many challenges -- the interruption of their schooling, difficulties with housing, ineffective transportation and limited finances for living and daycare. In this study, the researchers' goal was to explore the experiences of adolescent mothers from their own perspective -- what worked for them, what didn't?

  • Generation Squeezed

    Feb 13

    by Tina Albrecht
    Acting Communications Manager

    A dual income family can hardly make ends meet, purchasing a home is virtually out of the question, child care cost basically as much as a mortgage, pressure to perform at work leaves parents with little time to spend as a family. The realities facing today’s young Canadian families look nothing like I remember from my childhood.

  • Parental Love Is a Brain Changer

    Feb 06

    by Ruby Banga
    Program Coodinator

    Can love change your brain?  With only a week to go before Valentine’s Day, it seems like a natural time to ask that question, and for the love-struck among us, the answer seems natural too: of course it can!
     

  • Support for Grandparents and Kids

    Feb 06

    by Cara HyKawy
    Communications Assistant

    I have great memories of the time I spent with my grandparents as a child. On weekdays, while my parents worked, both sets of grandparents shared an alternating schedule of babysitting me.  For families who live close to one another, those kinds of caregiving arrangements can be rewarding for everyone concerned – kids, grandparents, and parents. 


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